Where Does Our Future Lie?

5 de junio de 2007

<body><div id="article"><tr><td height="23" valign="middle" width="184"></td><td valign="middle" width="185"></td></tr><h1>Where Does Our Future Lie?</h1><p>June 5, 2007 (LPAC)-- <em>As the Group of Eight industrialized countries prepares to meet tomorrow in Germany, where Russian and American groups have said they will present the Bering Strait link for their consideration, Elizabeth Mendel, a former elected officer of the Alaska Democratic Party and an organizer of the LaRouche Youth Movement, sent this letter to Alaskan Democratic Party and government officials.</em> </p><p>Alaska's Democratic Party is uniquely positioned, today, to seize upon one of the greatest opportunities we have ever encountered, so that tomorrow, when our youth have assumed leadership in the world, they will look back with pride on the year 2007 as a turning point in history.</p><p>We must take the lead in building the Bering Strait rail tunnel, as christening the bridge to a new era, one dedicated to the common good of mankind. As statesman Lyndon LaRouche has often repeated, "Economic development is the new name for Peace."</p><p>When Russia proposed to the United States, at an international conference on April 24th, to collaborate in building a high-speed rail link across the Bering Strait, countries from Sweden to Japan hailed the offer as a breakthrough in the international relations of mutual benefit. Those invited to represent the United States were former Governor Walter Hickel and Lyndon LaRouche, whose paper titled "," was read by his associate Dr. Jonathan Tennenbaum. In this paper, LaRouche urged the United States to make a sudden return to the traditions of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, to avert the onrushing disintegration of the world's present monetary-financial system of free-trade "globalization." Should the United States enter into emergency cooperation with Russia, China, and India, and initiate a new, just world financial system premised on the partnership of perfectly sovereign nation-state economies, we could finally begin addressing the long-standing suffering of the poorest Alaskans, Americans, and people of the world. Young Alaskans don't need more Walmarts, or Starbucks; we need a future! We must now start building that future, so those of us who feel alienated from the corruption of today, will have solid reasons to be optimistic for tomorrow.</p><p>As a politically active youth, born and raised in Alaska and as a former district chair, I think it is time to call upon Alaska's Democrats to look, not only to the next dinner party or fundraiser, or the next general election, or even to the next Presidential election, but instead to the future. It is time for us to look beyond 2008, to what sort of legacy we may leave for the coming generations. Our nation is currently careening recklessly towards general ungovernability: our administration is practically begging for its own impeachment, yet the Congress will not respond until citizens speak loud enough; thirty-six years of de-industrialization and outsourcing have left our people poor, and without needed social safety nets like medical insurance, pensions, reliable mortgages, living wages, and a trustworthy social fabric; entire villages are disappearing, and our university system is likewise bankrupt. We can reverse these problems through federally funded projects, such as the Bering Strait Tunnel, to springboard the development of living standards throughout the Interior and down into the rest of the continent.</p><p>With so much at stake it would truly be a tragedy if Alaska's Democrats chose not to seize the opportunities which present themselves. I encourage all of you to think, and act, from the standpoint of what the Earth's next 50 years have to offer.</p><p>Please read the attached information to find out more about this historic project.</p><p>()</p><p>Sincerely,<br />Elizabeth Mendel</p></div></body>